Con Com News

Protected: Dugdale Tree Farm, Sharon, 136 acres

Richard and Ann Dugdale of Walpole, Massachusetts, donated a conservation easement on 136 acres of their land in Sharon. A certified New Hampshire Tree Farm, the Dugdale easement will protect a large area of well-managed timberland, portions of an adjacent wetland, and extensive wildlife habitat for deer, moose, black bear, wild turkey, fisher, and numerous smaller animal species. The Sharon Conservation Commission partnered with the Monadnock Conservancy in bringing this project to fruition.

Liz LaRose, chair of the Sharon Conservation Commission, expressed the town’s appreciation: “The Sharon Conservation Commission is truly grateful for the Dugdales’ generosity in donating this conservation easement. Because the Dugdale property abuts the Robert P. Bass Memorial Town Forest on two sides, this gift protects an even larger area for wildlife to roam freely, ensures high water quality in Meadow Brook, and provides additional opportunities for hiking, hunting, snowshoeing, and other pedestrian public uses.”

Richard Dugdale has owned and improved the land since 1969. He said his motivation was “to protect this property for future generations and for wildlife to enjoy. The Conservation Commission and the Monadnock Conservancy made this protection possible.”

Richard and Ann Dugdale of Walpole, Massachusetts, donated a conservation easement on 136 acres of their land in Sharon. A certified New Hampshire Tree Farm, the Dugdale easement will protect a large area of well-managed timberland, portions of an adjacent wetland, and extensive wildlife habitat for deer, moose, black bear, wild turkey, fisher, and numerous smaller animal species. The Sharon Conservation Commission partnered with the Monadnock Conservancy in bringing this project to fruition.

 

June 19, 2008

Sharon Receives $700 Grant for Trail Signs

The Town of Sharon Conservation Commission received $700 for the Sharon Town Forest Fund from Public Service of New Hampshire’s Environmental Community Grant Program. The funds are earmarked for creating trail and directional signs in the Town Forest.

“These funds will help us to improve the experience of hikers in our town forest,” said the Conservation Commission Chair.  “We are grateful to PSNH for their generosity.” She said that the commission is looking for volunteers to help clear and re-blaze trails. She also noted that improving the town forest trails and erecting the signs might be a good Eagle Scout project.

Established in 1999, PSNH’s Environmental Community Grant Program provides support to nonprofit organizations, within the company’s service territory, that foster environmental preservation, improvement or education. Grants are awarded each spring and fall. The deadlines for submitting grants are April 15th and October 15th.  PSNH and its parent company, Northeast Utilities, are committed to helping the communities they serve protect the environment and preserve their rural charm.

Anyone interested in volunteering for upkeep and improvements to the Sharon Town Forest trail system can contact the Town for more information.

Sharon Adds 11.9 Acres to Town Forest

At a public hearing held on February 11, 2002, the Sharon Conservation Commission voted to purchase 11.9 wooded acres of land adjacent to the Robert P. Bass Memorial Town Forest from the Estate of J. Milton Street. The official closing for the property was on April 1, 2002.

“Milt Street was active in conserving land in the Town of Sharon and was an honorary member of the Conservation Commission,” stated Karen DeBonis, Sharon Conservation Commission Chair. “We were glad to be able to add his land to the town forest’s existing 864 acres.”

The woodland lot includes a portion of “Street Street,” the only access point directly into the northwestern portion of the town forest. DeBonis explained that in the past, Milt Street had granted permission to the Town of Sharon to utilize this private right-of-way. “This purchase adds to our town forest and secures a key access point for the Town of Sharon and its residents,” said DeBonis.

This land was purchased at its market value of $26,000 through Sharon’s Forest Fund. In order to preserve the town’s rural character and natural beauty, the Town of Sharon uses this fund to purchase undeveloped land such as the Street parcel. The fund is replenished via proceeds from selective timber harvests accomplished in accordance with a Forest Management Plan and Natural Resource Assessment.

Members of the Conservation Commission plan to continue clearing hiking trails in the forest this spring and will oversee a winter logging project on approximately 60 acres of white pine. Motorized vehicles, fires, trapping and camping are prohibited in the Town Forest.